2015 St. Louis Regional FRC

Later this week FRC Team 4931, aka Edwardsville Technologies, will participate in the 2015 St. Louis Regional FIRST Robotics Competition. The event is 3 full days of very intense  but friendly robotics competition – something FIRST calls Gracious Professionalism®.

The Event

The regional competition is free and open to the public! It’s a great opportunity to bring young students to show them how much fun science, technology, engineering and math can be. So stop by the Chaifetz Arena on the Saint Louis University Campus to see 43 teams and hundreds of high school students with their amazing robots.

Thursday is just a prep day for the teams, but the public is welcome on Friday and Saturday:

  • Friday, March 20 from 8:30-6:30PM
  • Saturday, March 21 from 9AM-5:30PM

detailed schedule is also available online. If you can’t make it in person but want to follow along, watch the live webcast or follow us on Twitter.

Of course, if you do come to the event, stop by our pit to say hi, talk to our students, and see our robot!

The Game

This year’s FIRST Robotics Competition (FRC) game is Recycle Rush℠:

Recycle Rush℠ starts with certain tasks to be performed autonomously in the first 15 seconds of the match, and then human drivers take over for the remaining 2 minutes and 15 seconds to  remotely command the robot to build stacks of totes, recycling cans, and pool noodles. Points are awarded based upon numbers of successfully accomplished tasks. Each match consists of two alliances of three teams, so teams and robots have to work together. And every match puts different teams on each alliance, so teams have to be able to work together will all kinds of different robots. (This is an extreme simplification – the actual game rules are very nuanced and specific and fill about 100 printed pages.)

Our Robot(s)

All FRC teams found out about the game on January 3, 2015, and had only 6 weeks to analyze the game, determine strategies, design and build our competition robot, program the control system, test the functionality, fix any and all problems, and practice driving. Then the competition robot has to be bagged (literally placed in a very large sealed plastic bag) and not touched until the first day of competition.

Team 4931's bagged robot

Here’s our competition robot before bagging:

Competition robot

Six weeks is terribly short, so many teams try to also build a second robot that they can continue to modify, fix, and test after their competition robot has been bagged. This was something we did this year for the first time, and our’s was identical in the most important ways but fairly crude in others (like drive train). Here’s our practice robot with a stack of the totes and recycling container:

Practice robot

There are several areas where totes are available: they can be loaded onto the field via two human player stations, and there are also up to 40 totes in an area of the field called the “landfill” zone. Although our robot can use the totes added from the human player station, our team decided to go for the more challenging task of picking up totes from the landfill. In fact, our robot is optimized for the exact layout of the totes in the landfill.

Field Layout

To save cost and to simplify testing, our robots share a single control system that we can move from one robot to the other.

Our control system

Of course, there’s a lot more to talk about, but the best way to see our robot is to come in person to the event and let us show you!

Our Sponsors

We’d like to thank our sponsors, who have supported us with grants and donations:

And thanks to our families, who have put up with our rigorous schedule!

None of this would be possible without them.